Tax Alerts
June 13, 2021
Tax Briefing(s)

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to affect local communities and global economies, Bezold Tax & Accounting Services, LLC remains committed to serving your tax and financial planning needs. As part of this commitment, we want to make you aware of key tax provisions impacting businesses contained in the year-end coronavirus relief legislation, known as the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (H.R. 133), that was signed into law on Dec. 27, 2020.


Here we go again! Seems like we just finished filing 2019 returns and ready, set, go for 2020.

We have learned a lot this year! And, we face 2021 with great optimism. The last few months have been spent upgrading and learning new ways to communicate with you as our main priority. As you are aware, late the filing season everyone's world was rocked with COVID 19. Ours included. We had to maximize safety precautions to keep both you and us safe and still prepare accurate and timely tax returns. Like doing a 360 in the middle of an ocean!


Filing Season Begins!


Dear Taxpayers:

Here is an overview of key provisions in the recent COVID relief legislation that affect individuals. The legislation is the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020 (the "Act" or COVIDTRA) and the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (TCDTR), both of which are part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.


Dear Business Client:

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (the CCA, 2021), signed into law on December 27, 2020, is a further legislative response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The CCA, 2021 includes--along with spending and other non-tax provisions and tax provisions primarily affecting individuals--the numerous business tax provisions briefly summarized below. The provisions are found in two of the several acts included in the CCA, 2021, specifically, (1) the Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020 (the TCDTR) and (2) the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020 (the COVIDTRA).


Starting this week, the Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service are sending approximately 8 million second Economic Impact Payments (EIPs) by prepaid debit card.

For those who don’t receive a direct deposit, they should watch their mail for either a paper check or a prepaid debit card. To speed delivery of the payments to reach as many people as soon as possible the Treasury’s Bureau of Fiscal Service is sending payments out by prepaid debit card.



Click above for Update on Office Status, Tax Returns and Stimulus Checks during COVID-19


This document provides a brief summary of tax provisions contained in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, H.R. 748, and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, H.R. 6201. Further research and analysis are recommended based on each client’s facts and circumstances.
Coronavirus


On April 28, 2021, the White House released details on President Biden’s new $1.8 trillion American Families Plan. The proposal follows the already passed $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act and the recently proposed $2.3 trillion infrastructure-focused American Jobs Plan. The details were released in advance of President Biden’s address to a joint session of Congress.


The IRS announced that it had started issuing refunds to eligible taxpayers who paid taxes on 2020 unemployment compensation that was excluded from taxable income by the recently enacted American Rescue Plan (ARP) (P.L. 117-2).


A safe harbor is available for certain Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan recipients who relied on prior IRS guidance and did not deduct eligible business expenses. These taxpayers may elect to deduct the expenses for their first tax year following their 2020 tax year, rather than filing an amended return or administrative adjustment request for 2020.


Individuals may use two special procedures to file returns for 2020 that allow them to receive advance payments of the 2021 child credit and the 2021 Recovery Rebate Credit.


The IRS has provided guidance for employers, plan administrators, and health insurers regarding the new credit available to them for providing continuation health coverage to certain individuals under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA) during the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) emergency.


The IRS has reminded employers that under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARP) ( P.L. 117-2), small and midsize employers and certain government employers are entitled to claim refundable tax credits that reimburse them for the cost of providing paid sick and family leave to their employees due to COVID-19. This includes leave taken by employees to receive or recover from COVID-19 vaccinations.


The IRS has reminded taxpayers who owe 2020 taxes that there are different ways to pay their taxes online, including payment options for many people who cannot pay in full.


The IRS reminds taxpayers that May includes National Hurricane Preparedness Week and National Wildfire Awareness Month. It urges taxpayers to create or review emergency preparedness plans for surviving natural disasters.


Dependent care assistance benefits carryovers and extended claims period amounts that would have been excluded from income if used during the preceding tax year will remain excludable in tax years ending in 2021 and 2022. In addition, these benefits will not be taken into account in determining the dependent care benefits exclusion limit for the tax years ending in 2021 and 2022.


The Treasury Department has released a statement discussing investment in the IRS and improving tax compliance. 


Michael Jackson’s image and likeness, as well as his interests in two trusts—one trust (NHT II) that held his interest in the Sony/ATV Music Publishing, LLC, and one trust (NHT III) that held Mijac Music—were valued for estate tax purposes.